Tag Archives: dan tyte

Cardiff events preview, Saturday 19 May: Publish Cardiff, TEDxCanton, The Offline Project Launch

There are three MASSIVE events taking place today in Cardiff for the alternative arts scene – Publish Cardiff (full preview below courtesy of Ben Newman), TEDxCanton which is being organised by our very own Hana, and “friend-of-the-blog” Dan Tyte having a launch party for his new novel, The Offline Project. Hopefully we’ll see you at one of these things!!

TEDXCANTON

Follow @TEDx_Canton for updates throughout the day! You’ve got @HeliaPhoenix doing the social updates, so gawd knows what will pop up on there.

THE OFFLINE PROJECT LAUNCH 

We published an interview with author Dan Tyte yesterday on the site – be sure to pop along to The Offline Project launch party for his new novel at the Transport Club TONIGHT from 7-10pm; plus music from John Mouse, Adwaith and Simon Love and The Old Romantics.

PUBLISH CARDIFF

Now, to the main event – a preview of the wonderful Publish Cardiff event at Little Man Coffee, 11am – 7pm. Take it away, Ben!

Publish Cardiff, NO LIVE SPORTS HERE

The forever hard working Publish Cardiff has arranged another series of talks following the group’s immensely popular events last year. Featuring 1-hour talks by industry experts and social stalwarts BRICKS Magazine, Polyester Zine, Gal-Dem, Cheer Up Luv, amongst others, the catalogue of speaking arrangements hopes to shed a light on magazine culture and the surrounding industry.

At its core, Publish Cardiff is a reaction against the lack of representation in the magazine industry. The group champion alternative education and support methods for creatives outside the London bubble, as well as shedding light on all degrees of societal inequality. The event is also a chance to network, communicate and share a drink or two with like-minded individuals.

The event opens with a talk by Polyester Zine editors Ione Gamble and Gina Tonic, who will discuss zine culture, the representation of marginalised bodies, as well as the feasibility of alternative publishing as a career. This talk is followed by Eliza Hatch, the creator of Cheer Up Luv, who retells the sociological normalisation of street harassment on women, as well as how Cheer Up Luv came to be.

Chief sub-editor of Gal-dem Kuba Shand-Baptiste will then provide an introduction to Gal-dem, as well as contextualising some of the challenges of working in media spaces. The talks themselves will end with Tori West of BRICKS magazine, which will be an unmissable primer on how to pitch, prepare and submit work to publications.

Afterwards, between 17:30 and 19:00, there will be an opportunity to have free drinks and a networking session, with tea and coffee provided throughout the day. Buy tickets for Publish Cardiff, or see a full timetable of the events below:

11:00 Polyester Zine Editors Ione Gamble and Gina Tonic

12:30 Creator of Cheer Up Luv, Eliza Hatch

14:30 Chief sub-editor of Gal-dem, Kuba Shand-Baptiste

16:00 How to Submit to Magazines by Tori West of BRICKS magazine

17:30 – 19:00 FREE drinks and networking session

The event will be taking place at Little Man Coffee, on Bridge Street (you know the place, near the Motorpoint, just opposite St. David’s, where all the cool kids skate).

More information, as well as pricing, can be found on the Publish Cardiff Eventbrite page. The networking session between 17:30 – 19:00 will be free, group and individual event tickets can be bought if you only want to attend one talk.

***

Cardiff author Dan Tyte unleashes new novel, The Offline Project

Today we speak to author Dan Tyte about his novel The Offline Project, OUT NOW!

My first novel, Half Plus Seven, was written, in the main, in Cardiff but its story took place on the streets and in the suburbs of an Everycity.  It was probably an unconscious homage to the director John Hughes, who set his films in the made-up town of Shermer, Illinois, but the reality was I felt like the issues of the book could and should resonate with people everywhere; Toronto, Tokyo; that setting a novel in Cardiff could have been a barrier to that.

Those feelings of universality are the same for this new novel, The Offline Project. It’s the story of Gerard, a millennial who moves back home to Cardiff from London. Perennially online and defined by those interactions, his sense of self-worth is inextricably linked to his online persona. Too much internet fries his brain and he leaves Wales and goes off-grid living in a community of former online addicts in the Danish woodland, where the new way of living might be more sinister than it first appears.  These themes and conflicts feel like a very real issue, for me at least, and perhaps a lot of others in society today, coming to terms with how to be good to our brains and bodies after collectively sleepwalking into relying on the internet for almost everything.

Despite the themes being broad-brush, and novel’s one’s location decision, it felt important to me to set the novel in Cardiff. There aren’t many books I can remember reading that have been set here: Dannie Abse’s Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve, John Williams’ The Cardiff Trilogy, Roald Dahl’s Boy; and only one of them is purely fictional. The city continues to grow in stature and unless its artists are confident enough to use it as the backdrop for stories, why should the rest of the world care?

The Offline Project’s Cardiff is a modern Cardiff, the city of the here and now, looking towards the future but grounded in myth and mysticism. For Gerard, for lots of us, that’s a city of freelance creatives, of Welsh mams, of world class museums and minimum wage jobs, of craft ale bars and intercontinental visitors. A city hurtling towards tomorrow helped by a history of industry and internationalism. I hope you’ll like spending time there.

Dan Tyte’s second novel The Offline Project is out now on Graffeg Books and available from the Graffeg website and from Amazon. He’s on Twitter @dantyte.

***

A lifetime of supporting Cardiff City – Dan’s story

dan_tyte_ninian_park1_web

Ninian Park. What a strange name. What a strangely alluring place. Its shabby terraces, corrugated iron and wooden seats had been my home-from-home for the past 20 years or so. My dad had first taken me down the City (as we call following the local association football team here) for a promotion party game against Crewe Alexandra in May 1988.

And from the moment I sat in the grandstand that day until the final whistle when grown men with bad 80s perms and tight stonewash jeans invaded a little piece of grass and danced around and hugged each and just looked so bloody happy, I was hooked. I wanted to be that happy. Every Saturday please. No more BMX rides around Splott or shopping trips to town with my mum for me. No way. I was going to the happiness factory to dance around, have a bit of a laugh and forget about my biology homework.

Turns out we didn’t get promoted every Saturday. Most Saturdays we lost and it rained and there was no dancing and very little hugging. I can only blame my father. Taking me to a promotion party for my first ever game was the equivalent of taking a girl to Paris on a first date. ‘Yes darling, I’m always this romantic’ you’d say as she gazed into your eyes at an intimate Michelin-starred restaurant on the banks of the Seine while a waiter brought over oysters and champagne and the band struck up Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’, knowing full well next week she’d be lucky to get half a cider out of you at the Labour Club and she’d better keep quiet as there was a good singer from the Valleys on.

And then last year, after two decades of bad dates, the old place was no more. Knocked down flat to have houses built on it, while the City moved to a brand new state-of-the art piece of Meccano across the road in Leckwith. Like most Bluebirds fans, I had mixed feelings about the move. It was painfully obvious the club needed to move with the times and have a place to call home that was attractive to people other than sadistic football fans and which could ring the tills seven days a week through hosting everything from business breakfasts to Bar Mitzvahs.

But Ninian Park was home. Having moved around a hell of lot over the past ten years (student accommodation in Liverpool to shared house to failed house purchases with girlfriends to sofas) and with neither of my parents living in my childhood home, it was the place I felt most comfortable on Earth. And it was being taken away too.

Ninian Park saw some sights in its time. Crowds of 60,000. Pope John Paul II. Bob Marley. And me.

Dan Tyte is a PR Director at Working Word. He loves debut albums, tea and, as you probably guessed from the above, Cardiff City FC. He’s on Twitter @dantyte, writes a column about man stuff for the Western Mail, blogs for Wales Online Your Cardiff, wrote about music for the dearly departed Kruger Magazine and other stuff for other national mags. He’s currently writing his debut novel, which you’ll all be reading on Eastern European city breaks in 2015.

Dan was photographed at Ninian Park by Ffion Matthews

dan_tyte_ninian_park2_web

***