Tag Archives: music

Meet The Jutes: Cardiff’s answer to Pavement … via Addis Ababa

Hold on to your pants, one of our favourite Cardiff bands (who played at our book launch back in 2015) are dropping their debut album this week as a Christmas gift to you all! Here’s Robin from the Jutes to take you through the album track by track, along with a video (made by our very own Jameso) and some gorgeous album art….

You can listen to Rumours in the peloton by the Jutes below, and don’t forget to follow them on Twitter: @TheJutes

Track 1: Permutations among the nightingales

A scene-setter rather than a first song, really, this was an instrumental guitar piece I’d had knocking around for a while that we quickly jammed and recorded in the studio. We recorded all of the basic tracks for this EP in one hectic day in the Music Box this spring – live as bass, drums and guitar, and pretty much in the same sequence as the track-listing.

Sadly Dan – our bassist – couldn’t make it, so Adam deputised on bass as well engineering/producing with his brother Paul. Adam was a complete monster – playing all these songs for the first time on the day we recorded them. I imagined this as the soundtrack to a shot of a car driving towards the vanishing point in the American mid-west at sunset. Not sure that explains the frog noises.

Track 2: Light a match

An attempt at a punchy, crowd-pleasing first proper song, we tried to channel Yo La Tengo and the Lemonheads, with hopefully some Real Estate guitar on the chorus. It’s one of only two songs on the EP about anything – distracting yourself from existential boredom by chit-chat and getting drunk. I tried to go full J Mascis with the guitar solo, but perhaps mustered up a slightly virile Norman Blake from Teenage Fanclub.

Track 3: Dear Susan

I really love Orange Juice (Edwyn Collin’s early-’80s fusion of the Byrds, Chic and fey Scottish teenagers with plastic sandals and fringes like Roger McGuinn) and this is intended as a straight-up homage.

The first line (“Evidently my dear Susan”) seemed like the sort of comically overblown thing Edwyn Collins would sing, though I couldn’t quite manage the voice – which Alexis Petridis described as like “a tipsy man launching into an after-dinner speech with his mouth still full of port and walnuts”. The lyrics are an aggressive take-down of religious extremism, which should hopefully sort a few things out.

Track 4: Gallic Way

When I formed the band I basically wanted us to be Pavement, but we could never manage their nonchalant slacker charm. Sounding like you don’t care and still being good is really hard! This is probably as close as we got. I think Neil nailed the drums, which sound like someone very drunk falling down the stairs holding a pint and somehow not spilling a drop.

The lyrics are fairly Malkmus-pastiching, but those are the sort of lyrics I like – a collection of (hopefully) striking images and phrases rather than a coherent narrative. No-one listens to lyrics beyond the first verse and the chorus anyway. The chorus refers to a traumatic haircut I once received where the hairdresser maintained eye-contact with me – in the mirror – throughout, seemingly never once looking at my hair/head, and relying on some sort of echo-location to avoid cutting my ears.

Track 5: Persian Regret

The name for this song is taken from the Jutes range of hard-wearing interior paints. The concept (for the song rather than the paint range), is that you (YOU) have just stepped out of a taxi in down-town Addis Ababa and into a club where this music is playing. Full disclosure: I’ve never been to Addis Ababa or listened to any Ethiopian music. Paul made some throat-noises, as this is what he presumes happens in Addis Ababian nightclubs.

Track 6: Borderline

This starts as a charming tale of love thriving in the tedium of low-level espionage, but quickly resolves into gibberish. Quite an unorthodox pronunciation of “archipelago”, but I’m sure Mick Jagger has done worse. After a straight-up American 90s college-rock first half we tried to seamlessly weld a 70s psych-rock outro onto the back like a backstreet mechanic. I enjoyed trying to play guitar like Neil Young, anyway.

Track 7: Plane

Another contender for most-Pavementy-song (an attempt to channel Here from Slanted and Enchanted), this was the first song we wrote as a band, and the last one we recorded. Despite playing it for over two years, 6 songs into the session I experienced some sort of studio-induced dementia and had to do star-jumps in the car park until I could remember how to play it again. Paul (producer and long-time friend and collaborator) reminds me that this is the second time I’ve used the line “sold up and moved to Tibet” in a song, which could tell you something (I’ll plagiarise anything: including myself).

I’m glad there’s some funny guitar halfway through. For me, the worst thing that’s happened in music in the last 20 years is the dominance of self-obsessed earnestness – in indie music and X-factor pop. When people talk to each other, they constantly use irony and humour, but when they pick up a guitar or a microphone they so often rely on po-faced seriousness. Whatever happened to Chuck Berry singing about his ding-a-ling?

The Jutes are:

Robin Wilkinson: guitars, vocals, songs, arrangements
Neil Williams: drums, arrangements
Adam Rustidge: bass, keys, percussion, production, engineering, mixing
Dan Holloway: bass inspiration, arrangements
Paul Rustidge: production, engineering, mixing, head of logistics
Recorded at Music Box, Cardiff
Mastered by Charlie Francis at Synergy Mastering

Photos courtesy of Lorna Cabble and Peppe Iovino, from the We Are Cardiff Press launch party in November 2015.

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Jenny moved to Cardiff … because of Human Traffic

This week’s up close and personal comes from an old raver who moved to Cardiff in 1999. Her inspiration: Justin Kerrigan’s clubtastic Cardiff-based flick, Human Traffic. Here’s Jenny to tell us more.

I can still remember the first time I saw Human Traffic. Sounds ridiculous, but that film changed my life. I was living in Exeter and I messed up my A level exams, and so ended up with shoddy grades, unable to get into any of my university choices. I only just managed to get into Reading, but I didn’t like Reading at all. Most of my friends were off travelling, and I just didn’t seem to click with anyone there. One night, my flatmates suggested we watch a film before we went out. One of them had this new film, Human Traffic, on video (VHS!!! Imagine). I’d heard vaguely about it but couldn’t afford to go to the cinema back then, so hadn’t seen it.

We watched the film in the communal area (which was basically the kitchen), all wrapped up in blankets, sitting on uncomfortable kitchen chairs, smoking spliffs and drinking beers, totally absorbed in the whirlwind 99 minutes of clubs, drugs, pubs, and parties, all set in this magical narnia called Cardiff. The soundtrack was amazing, the people seemed friendly, the city like a neon playground inviting you from club to house party, back to club.

I realise, obviously, that the film’s not without fault. The dialogue is clunky sometimes, the storyline abjectly ridiculous. But it’s not really about any of that, so none of that matters. It’s about capturing a moment in time. It’s about being a certain age, being part of a scene, when you might never have really belonged anywhere before. And by those standards, it might as well be Citizen Kane. That’s certainly how I felt about it.

Also Danny Dyer. It is most definitely about Danny Dyer.

I was super fed up with Reading, and my friend Pete was at uni in Cardiff, and so during the first term I bought myself a railcard and took the train there to visit. There was some event on at Solus in the student union – maybe Carl Cox, or something? The entire union was covered in camo netting – it was everywhere. By this point, drugs had entered my recreational lexicon. I hid the pills in my bra and we distributed them amongst us when we got in there. Pete’s flatmates came with us too, they were still in that slightly awkward initial freshers phase, where you sort of have to hang out together because you haven’t met your tribe yet, but they were all lovely, if awkward.

I was off my face, ended up snogging this cute blonde that lived in a student flat a few buildings away from them. The music was a mixture of trance and hard house. It was epic, driving music, with enough weird psychedelic sounds to keep your brain tweaking while you danced and stamped away, blissed out.

Pete and his flatmates ended up meeting loads of new friends that night – we all went back to someone else’s flat in Talybont South, where they produced endless amounts of weed and bongs, lungs, shotties. I never really liked weed so opted to just keep drinking booze and smoking fags. We hotboxed ourselves in that tiny living area until it started getting light, when we all stumbled back to Pete’s flat, shading our eyes from the dazzling October skies.

We couldn’t sleep, of course, so after a few hours fitfully rolling around on the floor, Pete decided we needed a fry up and then to go back to the pub. We didn’t bother showering – I think I just about managed to brush my teeth – and back out into the wilds we went, all wearing sunglasses, clutching cans of Oranjeboom, heading up to Cathays to The Warm As Toast Cafe (Twat … RIP!) for ‘breakfast’.

After we’d managed to hold down the food, Pete started getting a second wind. We headed for the nearest pub – can’t remember which one it was now, one on the way into town. It might have been Inncognito, which later became Cardiff Arts Institute. It was late afternoon by this point and they had DJs setting up in there. We alternated between pitchers of beer and pitchers of cocktails, and although it’s almost impossible to get pissed the day after a massive session, the day-after drinking always felt so nice: like a big cushion around your come down. (I would find out years later was actual real come downs were like: when you’ve got an unforgiving 9-5 and you haven’t slept all weekend and by Wednesday you think everyone hates you and wtf does your life mean and literally want to fall into a hole and die).

Feeling slightly more sprightly, we decided to head into town. It was only about 5pm at this point and all the shops were still open, so I got a whistle stop tour of the most important independents: Hobos, for natty threads; Catapult, for all your dance music; and Spillers, for indie, rock, and everything else. I bought a London Elektricity CD from Catapult (I still have it!) and a Spillers t shirt which I wore over my shirt for the rest of that night.

We went for a burger in the Gatekeeper, and Pete bumped into some friends from his course, who were heading into Clwb Ifor Bach, which really was a ‘Welsh club’ back then: we were only allowed in as we went in with some Welsh speakers, and I got given a membership card to sign that promised that I was learning Welsh (something I’ve still not managed to master, despite having lived here for nearly 20 years now – good job they don’t check up on you anymore).

The night gets hazy after that. Endless trips to the damp loos, as Pete got some charlie off someone in the queue. Sneakily smoking spliff on the dancefloor. I can’t even remember what the music was now, maybe some sort of indie night. The crowd was completely different though. Fewer students. More young professionals.

We got to bed around 2am and slept til about 3pm. I woke up already late for my train, and had to get a taxi to the station. I made it with seconds to spare. I got a Burger King when I was back in Reading and slept through all of my Monday lectures.

And that was the first of many such weekends in Cardiff. I was back in Cardiff every weekend during that first term. I bumped into Meic again (the blonde guy I’d snogged that first night), and soon we were an item. Eventually realised there was no point in travelling back and forth all the time. My heart was in Cardiff. Not necessarily with Meic – we split up after a few months – but in the city. Pete moved in with his girlfriend so I took his room and moved in with his flatmates. Turns out we were a tribe all along!

I thought I might apply to Cardiff Uni, but my grades hadn’t been great, and I didn’t really know what I wanted to do – I just knew I was much happier doing anything in Cardiff than I had been in Reading or back in Devon.

I gave up on the idea of uni altogether and started working. Like lots of people, I guess, I was temping, doing all sorts of different things, and then just sort of fell into working in events. I think I got to have the best of both worlds, back then: I hung out with students all the time. I even went to a couple of lectures, just to see if I’d enjoy it. But I didn’t really.

My memories of those days revolve around the nightlife. I made so many good friends on nights out – people I’m still close to now. Friendships forged in sweaty hugs and toilets and on dancefloors across the city. I even ended up meeting some people that had been extras in Human Traffic itself – extras in the house party scenes towards the end. They told me they’d wanted to make it as realistic as possible, so they were all smoking spliffs and drinking beers. TRUTH.

The venues were key. The Emporium, for example – where I spent so many nights – was where part of Human Traffic was filmed. You can even see some of its posters in the background of the scene where Jon Simm tries to blag his way into the club – apparently this scene was shot in the manager’s office.

Then there was Welsh Club. The Toucan. The Hippo. The Model Inn. Club M. Club X. Gretzskys. Metros. Apocalypse or Vision  or whatever it was called by  the end (it then turned into Primark … and is now some other high street chain shop). The Student Union – Solus upstairs, and Seren Las downstairs. The Philharmonic. Evolution and the party bus from town to the bay. Barfly. Sugar. Moloko. The Point. There was some place behind a fancy dress shop on Clifton Street we’d go to for after hours parties. And we used to go to everything: techno, drum & bass, the reggae parties down the Bay. Hard house was more of a push for me but I’d still go.

There were some nights we wouldn’t leave the house until midnight. These days I can’t remember the last time I was even awake at midnight without there being a baby crying or a dog with the runs demanding to be let out of the house. How things change!

Venues open and close. Unless you were around Cardiff at the start of the 2000s, you probably don’t even recognise half those places I’m talking about. The union is all coffee shops now. I read something recently about how students and young people don’t rave or drink or take drugs anymore, and it made me sort of sad, double sad, for them – that they won’t experience all those amazing things – but also myself. I miss those days. I miss being young and carefree and not having kids or a mortgage to worry about and being able to spend all night roaming around the city, smoking rollies with tramps and going back to random houses for parties.

Don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t change my life now for the world. I just wish I’d revelled in those days, in that time a bit more. Also it was a weird time in terms of the internet – right early days, so it’s not like I can just flick through Facebook albums whenever I feel nostalgic. I barely had a mobile phone at that time, and I certainly didn’t have a digital camera until nearly a decade later.

As for Human Traffic now? I actually haven’t watched the film in ages. It’s a treat that I save up for myself when I’m poorly. I love doing that really boring thing of “I know where that is!” when they’re in some of the outdoor scenes. And I know I’m not the only one that really loves it: because I still see articles about the filming locations or interviews with Justin Kerrigan popping up every so often.

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Jenny Jones is an events manager who dreams fondly of her youth. She currently lives in Fairwater.

Wanna read more?

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Astroid Boys – Broke Album Release, Clwb Ifor Bach

Local outfit Astroid Boys hit a sweet milestone recently, with the release of their Broke album. Photojournalist Aiyush Pachnanda went along to document the night!

In their own words: Rising out of Cardiff’s unlikely CF10 area code, Astroid Boys have cultivated a movement that transcends multiple sub-cultures – a growth that defines them less as a band, and more as voice for the youth.

With a DIY ethos rooted in the punk and hardcore scene, mixed with the raw, narrative approach of grime culture – their sound fuses together multiple perspectives, channeling their aggressions and woes into a platform for creative expression and escapism.

Bringing everything to a climax through their high-energy live shows, the combination of attacking vocals, crushing guitars and Dellux’ signature production never fails to get a crowd bouncing, both cult followers and innocent bystanders alike.

BUY BROKE NOW

LISTEN TO BROKE NOW

www.astroidboys.com

Astroid Boys Facebook

Astroid Boys Twitter

Astroid Boys Instagram

Astroid Boys YouTube

See more of Aiyush’s photography at YO Snaps!

Listen to Ep 23 of Minty’s Guide Gig – where Minty speaks to Benji Wild

And to finish up, Phoenix’s favourite Astroid Boys song: Foreigners

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Green Man’s 15th birthday bash – our highlights video!

Well, it was one to remember! Possibly the strongest line up of any Green Man so far … plus more art, performance, fun times and pints of Growler than any Green Man before!

We’re prepping our We Are Green Man festival goer portraits, but for the time being, hopefully this will tide you over …

Early bird tickets for next year are out soon – make sure you do the thing and follow the lovely Green Man Festival in all the usual places …

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HUB Festival ’17 – August Bank Holiday weekend shenanigans!

So for the time being at least, Womanby Street has escaped the corporate clutches of various property developers and our independent venues are safe … so come celebrate with a weekend of music, art, performance, street food, and LOADS OF BOOZE –  between 25th – 27th August bank holiday weekend, gorge yourself on 200 ACTS // 12 STAGES // 3 DAYS // 1 WRISTBAND! Scroll to the bottom for full MASSIVE line up and venue breakdown.

HUB Festival Facebook event

HUB Festival is one of our favourite Womanby Street takeovers, and this year the line up is MASSIVE, plus street food from Feast Fest – I mean, what else could you ask?

They’ll be squeezing in rock, reggae, folk, blues, funk, hip hop, pop, jazz, disco, metal – as many genres as they can find, with promoters/labels/bands working together to show the rest of the country that Cardiff is absolutely buzzing.

Taking place at:
Clwb Ifor Bach // Fuel Rock Club // The Moon // Castle Emporium // Tiny Rebel // City Arms // Jones Court // Banc Car Park // The Busk Stop // Bootleggers // The Street

PLUS: Comedy, Spoken Word & Poetry, Performance Art, Live Graffiti & Street Dance, Carnival acts, Silent Discos, Feast Fest street food, guest DJs and Busk Stop!

WEEKEND TICKETS: 
Adult £25 adv + bf
Youth £10 adv + bf (ages 12-17)
Children under 12 go free.
Under 18s are allowed in all the venues until 9pm(apart from City Arms 7pm).

1-DAY TICKETS (SATURDAY OR SUNDAY)
Adult £15 adv + bf
Youth £7 adv + bf (ages 12-17)
Children under 12 go free.
Under 18s are allowed in all the venues until 9pm(apart from City Arms 7pm)

Tickets are on sale in Spillers Records Cardiff, Diverse Music Newport, and online from WeGotTickets.com + SeeTickets.com

See you front left by the speakers!

And for full line up by venue ….

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Cardiff Music Awards 2017 – photoblog

In true better late than never style, welcome to our photoblog about this year’s awards! Congrats to all the winners … and by winners, we mean everyone making, breaking and championing the arts in our fine city. You’re ALL winners to us!

The awards were compered by Thomas Evans (Made In Cardiff TV presenter) and held in Tramshed. Big love to local music hero Ed Townend who brain-birthed the awards, putting them on in conjunction with Cardiff PR firm agency River and Bear.

All photos by Stephen Meredith – read on for the list of winners!

  

Cardiff, United Kingdom. 30th March 2017. Johnny Cage and the Voodoo Groove play live during the Cardiff Music Awards hosted at Cardiff’s Tramshed venue © Stephen Meredith

WINNERS!

Best Music Video: Novo Amor & Ed Tullett – Alps (Storm & Shelter)

Best Production: MusicBox Studios

Best Music Publication: Roath Rocks

Best Radio Show: Showcase Wales on GTFM

Best EP/Single: Rebecca Hurn – Lifeline

Best Producer: Gethin Pearson

Best Album: Cakehole Presley – In The Used To Be

Best Local Promoter: Lloyd Griffiths (Gwdihw/Cosmogramma/All My Friends/Juxtaposed)

Best Regional Promoter: Llio Angharad (Dydd Miwsig Cymru/Welsh Language Music Day)

Best Venue: Gwdihw

Best Club NightTwisted By Design

Line Up Of The YearHub Festival

Best Breakthrough ActChroma

Best Live ActThe Moon Birds

Best FestivalFestival Of Voice

Promoter Of The Year: Lloyd Griffiths (Gwdihw/Cosmogramma/All My Friends/Juxtaposed)

Best DJ: Ransom

Best Solo Act: Jack Ellis

Best Group: Astroid Boys

Person Of The Year: Justin Evans (read Justin’s We Are Cardiff piece)

More: Cardiff Music Awards website

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Women of Wales in music: Chloe Jackson-Nott investigates

Photojournalist Chloe Jackson-Nott recently completed a project on women in music in Wales, about the lack of women in the industry and how we can address it. Take it away, Chloe!

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Niamh Doyle and Rebekah Price, presenters on Dragon Radio. All photography by Chloe Jackson-Nott.

My photography mainly focuses on music. There aren’t many female music photographers around, so within my work I wanted to photograph and talk to women in other parts of the music industry: whether that be, in a band, solo artist, radio presenter, photographer or enthusiastic gig-goer.

I found eight young women in different parts of the industry. They all do different things within it, and they agreed to speak to me and allowed me to photograph them.

Firstly, Daniele Lewis is a singer-songwriter from New Quay, West Wales. I stumbled across her at Sŵn Festival when looking through the schedule for female artists. Unfortunately, I didn’t get the chance to speak to her on the day but I did see her perform and she has a lot of friends and family around supporting her. Her performance had a calm vibe to it but at the same time you could see all of her enthusiasm and that she loved being up on stage.

I then spoke to Fenne Lily just before her show at Sŵn Festival in Clwb Ifor Bach who had travelled from Bristol to perform in Cardiff. She has strong views about how to get to where you need to be in the music industry and how you need to fight your way to the top, especially being female.

Before I started to find women to talk to about this, I knew I wanted to speak to Katie Hall from Aberdare as I have worked with and seen her band Chroma play live multiple times. She’s incredible. When she performs, she’s lost in performance – she doesn’t care what other people think about her. She’ll be dancing around the stage, giving enthusiastic facial expressions. You can tell she is very passionate about her music and take advantage of being the lead singer of a band with two other male members. She’s a great role model for young girls who want to make it big one day in music.

I also spoke to Dani Hewitt from Treherbet and Samantha Bull from Aberdare who volunteer with Young Promoters Network where they have worked with many women, including myself, who want to take the next step in music. They realised that all of the girls were coming to them for advice noticing that there were no other female role models for them, so decided to create a community called WOMEN (Women of Music Events Network.)

I then went to the students of all music courses at University of South Wales and found Ellie Strong from Cardiff who aspires to be a successful drummer, which is someone I had yet to come across so jumped at the chance to speak to her. She performs at Café Jazz every Monday to practice her skills and perform to a small crowd. Finally, I was asked to photograph two radio presenters from Dragon Media at University of South Wales who happened to be both female so spoke to them to get a different view as they were not in a band or aspire to be artists.

Women of Wales in music

Samantha Bull, 26, Aberdare, W.O.M.E.N

“There aren’t enough women in the music industry, progress is being made but it is slow. There is so much could be done and must be done to counteract the inequality that we as women face in the industry. From the culture that surrounds us and society it has been ingrained in us from a young age that all girls are in competition with each other. Take that thought and push it out of your brain. We need to come together and start supporting each other and celebrating each other’s achievements.”

Dani Hewitt, 26, Treherbet, W.O.M.E.N Cofounder

“There are a lot of men working in the music industry that I could look up to but not a lot of women that I could identify with and follow in the footsteps of. I volunteer with the Young Promoters Network and a lot of the girls starting coming to me and looking up to me to help them. It became a community where we supported each other with developing skills. As there aren’t a lot of female role models, I decided that I should be one for now for young girls who want to achieve their dreams and goals.”

Samantha Bull, 26, and Dani Hewitt, 26, running a W.O.M.E.N panel (Women of Music Events Network) panel at Swn Festival 2016 to inspire young girls to achieve their dreams in music.
Samantha Bull, 26, and Dani Hewitt, 26, running a W.O.M.E.N panel (Women of Music Events Network) panel at Swn Festival 2016 to inspire young girls to achieve their dreams in music.

 

Fenne Lily, 18, Bristol – Singer

“I think there are enough women in the music industry but not women who are actually doing what they want to do, because it’s quite easy to see a girl with an acoustic guitar and tell her she’s can be the next ‘Taylor Swift.’ I think it should cater to women more instead of having men setting up their career and choosing for them. I’ve been brought up by a lot of music as I was attending festivals at a young age so I knew this is definitely what I wanted to do with my life and have decided to build a career out of it. If it’s something you want to do, don’t let society’s opinions stop you.”

Fenny Lily performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.
Fenne Lily performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.

 

Danielle Lewis, 21, West Wales – Singer

“In the 10 years I have been performing live from school, my local scene at home, playing in Australia to moving to the city in Cardiff, I have seen a lack of women in music in all areas of the industry from playing to sound engineers and producing. It still seems to be a very male orientated business and as a female artist myself I have felt looked down at numerous times. I recently recorded my latest CD with a female producer for the first time and she herself agrees on the shortage. I do think we are becoming more aware of this and I look forward to a new wave of more females in the industry.”

Singer Danielle Lewis, 21, from New Quay, West Wales, performing on the Horizons stage at O'Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, 21, from New Quay, West Wales, performing on the Horizons stage at O’Neils on Saturday 22nd October.

 

Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O'Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O’Neils on Saturday 22nd October.

 

Katie Hall, 21, Aberdare – Singer

“There are definitely not enough girls in the music industry. It shouldn’t be the defining feature of you band that a girl is the front woman. There are so many talented and inspiring musicians that are girls. I think the way to inspire more girls to work in the music industry is to shatter that glass ceiling that’s oppressing women everywhere. The way we do that is challenging promoters attitudes towards women in bands so they give them more gigs. We need to inspire girls from a young age to get involved or pick up an instrument, and support the women who are currently involved in music to reach their full potential as artist.”

Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.

 

Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.

 

Ellie Strong, 20, Cardiff – Drummer

“I think there’s a common misconception that there aren’t a lot of women, but there are plenty of women in music; just not enough making grungy rock and shredding guitar! But then there are some gems like jazz and rock drummer Cindy Blackman, currently killing it in the band Santana.. I think what the current women in the industry need to realise is that ‘music’ isn’t a term to be taken lightly; it’s not always about image, which seems to be the case nowadays. So my advice to singers is that they should listen to Jill Scott’s raw vocals instead of whatever is in the charts, and to instrumentalists – keep doing your thing. Prove that we can do it just as well as the boys.”

women_in_music-08 women_in_music-09

 

Niamh Doyle, 20, Cardiff, Radio Presenter

“I believe that there are a few women who are extremely big at the moment, but that’s only a fortunate few. The advice I would give is to keep up their YouTube platforms, as this is a platform where anyone; gender, age, or race is welcome and as it is such a large platform, it is accessible to everyone around the world. We are also at a time in our lives where society is beginning to change the status levels between men and women; women are beginning to become more noticed and taken seriously. My final advice to women would be to never give up and to just keep their end goal in mind.”

Niamh Doyle, 20, student at USW and radio presenter at Dragon Media
Niamh Doyle, 20, student at USW and radio presenter at Dragon Media

 

 

Rebekah Price, 22, Cwmbran, Radio Presenter

“Music is an incredibly important thing in my life. I’ve always loved talking about it, listening to it, as well as making it. But I will admit that there has been times where I have stood back and questioned whether realistically, as a woman, I would be able to move forward in the industry. Negative thinking I know, but this was partly because I’d recently become aware of the gender divide within music festivals. When we look at festivals in particular, which essentially provide a platform for a large collection of artists and musicians, we can see that typically there is only a small percentage of female acts being seen.”

Rebekah (CORR) Price, 22, student at USW and radio presenter at Dragon Media.
Rebekah (CORR) Price, 22, student at USW and radio presenter at Dragon Media.

 

 

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Cardiff’s Free For All Festival 2017! The Moon / Full Moon, 5 – 31 January

Is it over? Has it finally finished? Has someone finally dragged 2016’s lifeless body out to the garden and buried it under a mountain of Leicester City and Nigel Farage memorabilia? Great, well let’s all collectively repress our memories of 2016 together with Free For All Festival running from 5 January to 31 January at The Moon Club + The Full Moon. They have kindly put on a month of free events – so don’t worry if your pockets are empty like the rest of us – with bands and artists of varying descriptions, so give your eardrums a treat and pop down to The Moon Club + The Full Moon and support these artists.

The event runs from 5 – 31 January, so if you’re gagging for an all-dayer or fancy checking out some local talent see the array of events on below.

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Tuesday 10 January, 8PM
Downstairs: 6foot7 + Paul Divers & support 8pm

Thursday 12 January, 8PM
Upstairs: Electrick Haze (EP launch) + KINGSON + Plasterscene + Lon Chaney 5 8pm
Thursday 12 January Facebook event

Friday 13 January, 7PM-10PM, 8PM-late
Upstairs: Electronic Music Wales showcase feat. Skeleton House & support 7pm-10pm
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The Black Hole Of Womanby St feat. Samurai Cop + DJs til late
Downstairs: Monsterometer + Godbomber 8pm
Friday 13 January Facebook event

Saturday 14 January, 5PM + 8PM
Upstairs: Maddie Jones – Band + Lilygreen’s Sky Machine + Instructions + Tobias Robertson + Charlie Says 5pm
Downstairs: Mike Dennis + AcouMetal & support 8pm

Sunday 15 January, 7PM-10PM + 6PM

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Upstairs: Staylittle Music presents Beth Goudie + Joe Bayliss + Matthew Frederick 7pm-10pm
Follow the event on Facebook
Downstairs: Timeless Promotions + Beast PR + HOPE not hate + Decidedly Records present Gareth Bonello (The Gentle Good) + Vinna Bee +Francesca’s Word Salad + Adwaith 6pm
Follow the event on Facebook

Tuesday 17 January, 7PM

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Downstairs: Fountainhead + Naomi Rae (single launch) + Harri Davies Music + Dusty Cut 7pm
Follow the event on Facebook. 

Wednesday 18 January, 7PM

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Upstairs: Pilgrim + Fireroad + Twisted Illusion + Stone Theory 7pm
Follow the event on Facebook. 

Thursday 19 January, 7:30PM

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Upstairs: Radioactivity electronic night 7.30pm feat Conformist / Music live + Sound Affects PR DJs

Follow the event on Facebook. 

Downstairs: PJNB presents Young Black Americans + Heavy on the Ride + Jimmy Watkins (The Vega Bodegas) 7.30pm

Follow the event on Facebook.

Friday 20 January, 8PM + 10:15PM

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Upstairs: We’re No Heroes + Tarsiers + Saccharyn & support 8pm

Downstairs: Mumbleman 10.15pm

Follow the event on Facebook

Saturday 21 January, 2PM + 9PM

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Upstairs: 8 O’clock Spot Alldayer feat: VAN-illa + Nuclear Lullaby + Soviets+ Handsome Ape + Boris a Bono + Silent Forum + Fingertrap + Rainbow Maniac + Grand Tradition 2pm

Downstairs: Run Logan Run 9pm

Follow the event on Facebook. 


Sunday 22 January, 2PM
Upstairs: RecRock Youth Music Project showcase 2pm (Ages 14+)
Downstairs: Pi & Hash Music alldayer feat:
Them By There + The Sam-Antonio Freeway + Thee Manatees + Siblings Of Us + Charlie Says + Canada Road & support. 2pm-11.30pm

Wednesday 25 January, 8PM
Upstairs: Project + Beatbox Hann + Turna Phrase & support. 8pm

Thursday 26 January, 7:30PM

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Upstairs: Aeddan – Music + Ofelia + Eädyth 7.30pm

Follow the event on Facebook

Friday 27 January, 7:30PM-10:30 PM + 9PM 

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Upstairs: Bubblewrap Collective stage feat. MY NAME IS IAN + Ivan Moult Music Band & more TBA 7.30pm-10.30pm

Downstairs: Happy Fun Time Game Band + Nightmares from the Discotheque 9pm

Follow the event on Facebook.

Saturday 28 January, 4PM

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2-floor alldayer! Tibet + Junior Bill + The Chalk Outlines + M I L K + Shop Girls + Them Dead Beats + Nevsky Perspective (solo – performing the works of Britney Spears) + Thom Bentley & more TBA. 4pm

Follow the 2-floor alldayer on Facebook. 

Sunday 29 January, 2PM
Forté Project // Prosiect Forté showcase – 2 floors! 2pm (Ages 14+)
Showcasing the 10 acts announced as part of the Forté Project scheme.

Monday 30 January, 8PM
Upstairs: CitySound Publications – magazine launch night feat. CHROMA & support 8pm
Downstairs: Anonymous Iconoclasts + Capra Mamei & support 8pm

Tuesday 31 January, 7:30PM + 8:00PM 

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Upstairs: LUCKYMAN RECORDS closing party! 8pm
LUCKYMAN RECORDS closing party on Facebook
Downstairs: Amy Grindhouse + Twisted Ankle + Heil Zilla + HODAD 7.30pm
Amy Grindhouse, Twisted Ankle, Heil Zilla and HODAD on Facebook

That’s all the free music and events you can partake in at The Full Moon + Moon Club this month, so be sure to get on down there and support your local scene. Even when your pockets are empty and the January cold bites a little harder than you remember, there’s still a way to support your local scene and – most importantly – your city. Be sure to check out some of these events as they are putting a lot into Cardiff, so it’s only fair for us to give back.

Oh, and have a fun, crazy, challenging and memorable 2017.

***

 

Sŵn Is Ten – photo essay

We had an absolute blast at this year’s Sŵn. Photojournalist Chloe Jackson-Nott was out and about capturing the bands and the vibe for  us …

Drummer of Himalayas, James Goulborn performing in Moon Club at Swn Festival on Saturday 22nd October 2016.
Drummer of Himalayas, James Goulborn performing in Moon Club at Swn Festival on Saturday 22nd October 2016.
Lead singer of Himalayas, Joseph Williams, performing in Moon Club, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Himalayas, Joseph Williams, performing in Moon Club, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Bassist of Himalayas, Louis Heaps, performing in Moon Club, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Bassist of Himalayas, Louis Heaps, performing in Moon Club, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Bassist of Himalayas, Louis Heaps, performing in Moon Club, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Bassist of Himalayas, Louis Heaps, performing in Moon Club, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Ellie James commonly known as Ellie Makes Music, performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.
Ellie James commonly known as Ellie Makes Music, performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.
Ellie James commonly known as Ellie Makes Music, performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.
Ellie James commonly known as Ellie Makes Music, performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.

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Fenny Lily performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.
Fenny Lily performing downstairs in Clwb Ifor Bach on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Drummer of Max Raptor, Pete Reisner performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Drummer of Max Raptor, Pete Reisner performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer of Max Raptor, Will Ray performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.

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Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Lead singer and guitarist of Black Foxxes, Mark Holley, performing in Tramshed, Cardiff on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O'Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O’Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O'Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O’Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O'Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O’Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O'Neils on Saturday 22nd October.
Singer Danielle Lewis, performing on the Horizons stage at O’Neils on Saturday 22nd October.

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Young Promoters Network working their own stage at Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.
Young Promoters Network working their own stage at Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.

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Singer Vince Jones performing on the Young Promoters Network in Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.
Singer Vince Jones performing on the Young Promoters Network in Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.

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Members of Chroma, Zac Mather, Katie Hall and Liam Bevan posing outside Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.
Members of Chroma, Zac Mather, Katie Hall and Liam Bevan posing outside Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.
Members of Chroma, Zac Mather, Katie Hall and Liam Bevan posing outside Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.
Members of Chroma, Zac Mather, Katie Hall and Liam Bevan posing outside Undertone on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma,  Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma,  Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Drummer of Chroma, Zac Mather, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Drummer of Chroma, Zac Mather, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma,  Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Bassist of Chroma, Liam Bevan, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Bassist of Chroma, Liam Bevan, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma,  Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.
Lead singer of Chroma, Katie Hall, performing in Undertone, Cardiff on Sunday 23rd October.

Sŵn Festival website

Sŵn Festival Facebook 

***

Sŵn 2016 – send in your memories for the Music Museum!

It’s (nearly!) here – our annual city-wide music takeover, celebrating the best in new music: it’s Sŵn Festival time again, and this time, Sŵn is ten years old, and they want to hear all your memories from over the years!

The memories will be displayed in the Music Museum. The museum will be open across the weekend and Sŵn have invited music aficionados to bring in three objects or musical memories in advance that mean something to them; these will be on show when the museum opens on Thursday.

Festival goers are still encouraged to share their memories can do so either by social media, or coming into the museum over the weekend to be recorded and added to the digital exhibition. Get involved and share your memories of Sŵn now!

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There are now two ways to donate:

1 – via  social media: tweet three images and stories to #SWNMM, or share on Facebook at the Sŵn Music Museum Facebook page.

2 – by bringing items and memories to the Museum to record over the Sŵn Festival weekend!

MUSEUM OPENING TIMES:

Friday 21st October (12-5pm)

Saturday 22nd (12-5pm)

Sunday 23rd (12-5pm)

The Sŵn Music Museum Facebook event

Location: Castle Arcade, Cardiff (more info)

The Museum is being built through the crowdsourcing of materials and the organisers are inviting music aficionados to bring along three objects in advance to be displayed during the Sŵn weekend. Virtual contributions can be made via social media or objects and stories can be taken to the museum and recorded on the spot. Students from the CU Archaeology and Conservation department will be on hand to offer advice on how to care for musical memorabilia. All the images and stories will be collected and displayed in the Sŵn Music Museum virtual gallery.

In other Sŵn news: S4C will also be filming an access-all-areas documentary of Sŵn this weekend, to air in December. It will feature interviews with artists, festival goers and organisers Huw Stephens and John Rostron. So make sure you’re wearing your lipstick and guyliner for when the cameras are rolling!

For those who haven’t seen it yet, here’s the line up, in eye-blistering full detail (open the image in a new tab and zoom in for Full Effect).

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See you on the dance floor – front left by the speakers, yeah?

***

 

HUB Festival ’16 – all the music you can eat in Cardiff this Bank Holiday weekend

August Bank holiday weekend in Cardiff promises a veritable smorgasbord of musical delights, as HUB Festival returns to Womanby Street with an extended selection of music, comedy and poetry!

HUB Festival 2016

Looks pretty incredible, right?? Tickets are a mindblowing £12 per day or just £20 for the full weekend!

Keep up to date with all news at the HUB Festival 2016 – Facebook event page

In the meantime, here are HUB Festival’s vital statistics …

HUB FESTIVAL 2016 – 200+ acts, 12 stages, 3 days – music, art, performance!

Tickets are £20 for 3 – days, on sale in Spillers Records, Diverse Music,Bristol Ticket Shop, WeGotTickets, SEE Tickets

THE STAGES: The Full Moon, The Moon Club, FUEL ROCK CLUB, Clwb Ifor Bach, Four Bars at Dempseys, Urban Tap House Cardiff, City Arms, Cardiff, Dempseys, Busker’s Revenge Pirate Ship and our Outdoor Stage!

THE LINE UP – SO FAR…
The Wave Pictures, RICHARD DAWSON, Johnny Cage & The Voodoogroove, Junior Bill, Crinkle Cuts, Hipicat, Desert Storm, We’re No Heroes, Sigiriya, Cowboy and the Corpse, Climbing Trees, Maddie Jones,Featherjaw, Lacertilia, Quiet Marauder, A N i • G L A S S, Harri Davies Music, Fingertrap, Heil Zilla, GOAN DOGS, Clay Statues, Tendons,Roughion, Boris a Bono, Pizzatramp, MY NAME IS IAN, Rainbow Maniac,Tides Of Sulfur, Mumbleman, Tommy & The Trouble, Winter Coat, Shop Girls, Heavy Flames, Aaronson, Bryde, Luk, HVNTER, Matthew Frederick,The Marks Cartel, Meilir, V A I L S, HOMES, The Johnstown Flood,Kookamunga, Seas Of Mirth, Punks not dad, VAN-illa, Thee Manatees,Dave Morris and the Knock, HODAD, Grand Tradition, This Is Wreckage,Local Enemy, Esuna, OldSamuel, Dead In The Water, La Forme, The Irascibles, Sophie Lynch and the Special FriendsFountainhead, Soviets, Great Revelations, Nuclear Lullaby, Rozelle, Everything by Electricity, Keto,Chloe Foy, Joe Bayliss, Grace Hartrey, The Fused, Alex Stacey, Cameron Trowbridge, The Sonny Bonds Duo, Welcome Back Delta, Eleri Angharad,Ellie Parris, Capra Mamei, Ofelia, Think Pretty, Sam Fowke Music, Blood Lips, Matt Troy, Fran Murphy, Mark Curtis, Fran Smith, Fritz O’Skennick, Clive Oseman, Mario Fiorrillo Umberto, Terri Hoskings, Gareth Davies, Natasha Borden, Will Ford, Ellie Powell, Georgia Paterson – Singer/Songwriter, To Bear Sir

CURATORS INCLUDE: All My Friends, BlueBox Promotions, Bubblewrap Collective, Blue Honey, Electric Harmony, LUCKYMAN RECORDS, Pi and Hash Music, The Psychedelic Priests, Radio Glamorgan, Rockpie, Sound Affects PR, The Hold Up, Young Promoters Network

BEER FESTIVAL, STREET PRESENTATION & FOOD
This year sees the addition of a beer festival featuring local craft brewers, a new street presentation with designers decorating the area, as well as musicians, poets, comedians, performing arts and street food.

Too many artists for you to keep up with? HUB have made a handy Soundcloud page, giving you a ‘greatest hits’ of this year’s bands. Put it on and let the music wash all over you!

See you down the front

***

Get classical with the Welsh Proms this summer

The 31st season of Wales’ National Classical Music Festival is happening in Cardiff in July! 

Founded by Owain Arwel Hughes CBE, the Welsh Proms takes place in Cardiff’s St David’s Hall.

The festival – which celebrates its 31st season in 2016 – annually features some of the world’s top orchestras, soloists and and additional artists, and continues to be a major focal point in the cultural calendar of the Welsh capital.

The 2016 Welsh Proms Cymru will run from July 16 to 23 and feature the world renowned Welsh National Opera Orchestra, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, The Cory Band & Massed Male Choir, and London’s Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

Full details of the 2016 programme of events, all conducted by Welsh Proms Artistic Director Owain Arwel Hughes CBE, are now available here.
July 16th-23rd St David’s Hall, Cardiff
Tickets priced £7.50 – £30.50 can be purchased from St David’s Hall Cardiff, tel: 029 2087 8444
16.7.16 Verdi Requiem with an all Welsh cast – WNO orchestra, 3 Cardiff choirs and
Welsh soloists
19.7.16 Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra perform Holst’s The Planets; the world
premiere of a newly commissioned work to commemorate the Battle of the
Somme by Paul Mealor; and For the Fallen by Karl Jenkins.
20.7.16 An evening of favourite classics ending with the 1812 Overture performed by the
Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.
22.7.16 The Cory Band and two Male Voice Choirs performing choruses and hymns.
23.7.16 The Last Night featuring two world premieres – Aberfan by Chris Wood and Mr
Dahl by Bernard Kane plus Gareth Wood’s Songs of Wales where the audience
joins in the singing and flag waving.

All the concerts are conducted by Owain Arwel Hughes CBE.
Full details on www.welshproms.com