introducing Fatherfest – the UK’s ONLY Festival of Fatherhood, september 2021 in Merthyr mawr

Very exciting news for dads out there – DadFest 2021 is bring a weekend of activities and fun to Merthyr Mawr in September. Read on to find out more!

DadFest, the UK’s only ‘Festival of Fatherhood’, starts Friday 10 September at Candlestone Campsite, Merthyr Mawr, South Wales. This unique festival, now in its 8th year and previously awarded ‘Best Small Event in the UK’ by the National Outdoor Events Association, is organised by Dangerous Dads CIC.

DadFest is for dads, male carers and their children (of all ages) and takes place at Candlestone Campsite, Merthyr Mawr CF32 0LS from Friday 10th September to Sunday 12th September.

DadFest organiser and founder of Dangerous Dads CIC, Ian Blackwell, is thrilled about this year’s DadFest.

“Dads tell us how much they value getting back to nature, chilling-out and spending special time with their kids and other father figures. It’s all about having some adventurous fun with their children such as playing in the woods, building dens, exploring nature, camping and sharing campfire stories, especially after the lockdown. This year there will also be circus skills workshops, bushcraft activities, great food and lots more. Although we have run DadFest in Cornwall and Devon in the past, this is our first time in Wales, so it is an exciting moment for us and we are really looking forward to seeing lots of Welsh dads having fun in the woods and at the beach.”

“Candlestone Campsite is ideal as the site extends to 15 acres, and includes exclusive access to a further 40 acres of the adjoining wood in which to walk, play and explore. Unlike traditional campsites the site retains a very natural feel and incorporates lots of habitat for wildlife, and it is close to the UK’s highest sand-dunes, the river Ogmore and the Glamorgan Heritage Coast. DadFest has access to the 840 acre Merthyr Mawr National Nature Reserve, a rolling expanse of sand dunes, woodland and a mile of sandy beach. The site is 20 miles west of Cardiff, in the picturesque thatched village of Merthyr Mawr, and 5 miles from J35 of the M4, and 2.5 miles from Bridgend. It really is an ideal and beautiful location.”

The festival is renowned for its highlight event – the ‘World Dad Dancing Championship’, hotly contested by grooving dads, much to the sheer embarrassment of their kids. As the Official WORLD Dad Dancing ChampionTM, the winning dad claims all the bragging rights it brings but first someone needs to dad-dance their way to the winning trophy. A unique trophy and prize awaits the winner.

DadFest 2021 will provide a range of activities including archery, storytelling, bat walks, bushcraft skills, campfire cooking, den building, circus skills, nature trails, live music, award winning beer & food, and more… Everything at DadFest is run by qualified, experienced leaders who are fully insured and all risk assessments are in place.

DadFest is a small, safe, and intimate festival focused on outdoor activities. Our aim every year is to get Dads and their children out and about in nature… especially after a year of being cooped up inside. This event will be COVID-secure but please do talk to us if you have any concerns or questions.

Adult Ticket – £85, children 6 and up – £40, children under 6 – £20. All activities and camping space are provided as part of every ticket. Food tickets available that entitles you to six hot meals, as well as water, juice, tea, and coffee as needed all weekend.

For more information please contact DadFest by email bookings@dangerousdads.org.uk or see the Dadfest website for tickets

Dates:
10th-12th September 2021

Venue: at Candlestone Campsite, Merthyr Mawr CF32 0LS

The university of south wales fashion and advertising street gallery.

This years graduating cohort at the University of South Wales Fashion & Advertising department have launched a graduation show with a difference. They’ve taken the show outside and city wide this year in the form of a ‘street gallery’, we love the idea!

The street gallery going up on Newport Road

If you’re out and about around Cardiff over the next few weeks, keep an eye out for the student work, its added a lot of colour across the city. You can see work from students studying Fashion Marketing and Business, Fashion Design, Fashion Promotion and Advertising Design. You can find the street gallery on Newport Road, St Andrews Place, Clare Road, Grangetown and Cathays. Each poster carries a QR code that leads you to more view student work. Its something worth keeping your head up for while you’re enjoying the city.

Letters from Cardiff in lockdown: ANONYMOUS #7

Today’s instalment for the Letters from Cardiff in lockdown series comes from a friend of ours, who has been working as a counsellor through the pandemic, helping ease those addled minds. We’re still open for stories, so if it’s taken you a while to put it together, it’s all good with us – please contribute to Letters from Cardiff in lockdown. 

Enlight15

“Oh zoom, you chased the day away
High noon, the moon and stars came out to play……”.    Zoom 1982
“Zoom is the leader in modern enterprise video communications, with an easy, reliable cloud platform for video conferencing “.    Zoom 2020

“A brand of carbonated soft drink produced in South Wales”.  Corona 1982
“Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing infectious diseases”. Corona 2020

In 1982, I was training to be a teacher and living in London.
In 2020, I had been a counsellor for thirty three years and was living in Cardiff.

I had spent the whole of my career meeting with people face to face in a variety of different rooms and settings and feeling enormously privileged to be able to do so.

Then … the world changed! Along came a global pandemic, forcing most of us to make changes to how we work and live. Many of these were eloquently described in “Letters from Lockdown “ which I really enjoyed reading last year.

I was also forced into finding other ways of being able to continue my counselling work and support my existing clients as well as offering a service to new ones.

Zoom was installed on my laptop and a new phase of my counselling work began, not without some trepidation. I worried about connections, both emotional and technological. What would be achievable working this way and would it be good enough?

I’ve had the good fortune to be able to access the counselling rooms I normally share with my two colleagues throughout this time.

Their situations and distance from our base have meant them working entirely from home so I’ve had the place to myself, which has felt very strange and rather lonely. A laptop stand and a comfy office chair were installed in one of the counselling rooms and my work online began.

I’ve been out of the house five days a week, dressed in my normal clothes and smelling of perfume (I feel weird without it) and garlic.

I realised early on that I didn’t have to limit my intake, as I usually do – an unexpected benefit!

So … same clothes, same hours, same rooms, just – no clients in the rooms!

All on screens or on the phone.

They see me in my usual working environment but I see them in very different surroundings – in their homes, their offices, their cars, their sheds. I see them in bedrooms, kitchens, living rooms.

I’ve seen a few people in their beds!

People in their pyjamas. Men without shirts. Lots of lounge wear.

I’ve seen peoples’ partners, children, pets. Lots of pets. Cats, dogs, geckos, snakes and a parrot ( all bringing comfort and companionship to their owners).

Delivery drivers have interrupted sessions on a regular basis.

I’ve travelled to other countries with people whose professional or personal lives have taken them far and wide. To Poland, the Balearic Islands, Turkey.

I’ve spoken with people in London and Edinburgh.

Previously, I would not have considered continuing to support people as they moved cities or countries and that already seems rather strange!

My clients have generally been marvellously adaptable, embracing Zoom, FaceTime and WhatsApp video with ease and we have made the most of it together. People are saying that they like the flexibility it will give them ongoing; they will be able to choose between attending in person (increasingly happening now) or from some other convenient location.

Some people will appreciate not having to travel, negotiating trains, buses or parking spaces. Most people however are missing being able to step out of their lives and into the safe space of the counselling room, with the physical presence of another.

At a time when lots of people have been struggling to feel connected to others, I have been enormously privileged to be so very connected to so many.

There’s been a new dimension to “seeing into peoples’ lives” as I have seen into their homes too!

I have also seen peoples’ goodness and kindness find new expression as they have shopped for their neighbours, shared their food, made donations to various causes and taken sunflower plants to a hostel for the homeless.

I have experienced , as always, peoples’ resilience, tested now in new ways.

I have learned that it’s possible to achieve a depth of connection online that I would not have thought possible previously, not only with people I have met in person but also with people I’ve only ever met onscreen.

My preferred way of working will always be “in the room” but much can be achieved online as people bravely work through the things that trouble them and trust me with their fears, anxieties, griefs and traumas. They share their achievements, their hopes and fears, their courage and humour just as they would in the room and as always, I have loved my work throughout.

On a very shallow level, I have learned how to apply a Zoom “improve my appearance “ filter.

This makes me a little concerned about meeting people in person. “My god,” they’ll think. “She’s aged. And she stinks of garlic”.

Want to write for Letters from Cardiff in lockdown? Find out how here…

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Cardiff – the NHS needs your blood!

Cardiff! Blood stocks across Wales are dropping. The Welsh Blood Service are looking for your help!

DID YOU KNOW – ONE BLOOD DONATION CAN SAVE UP TO SIX PREMATURE BABIES???

BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT TO GIVE BLOOD NOW!

Is giving in your blood? We need to give at least 350 donations of blood everyday to keep up with demand from hospitals in Wales. Did you know that a single donation can be broken down into its different components, so it can be used in various ways? These components all have differing life spans, which is why it’s important that we keep on giving! This is how long different parts of your blood will last after donation…

  • Platelets/White cells – 7 days
  • Red Cells – 35 days
  • Plasma can be frozen for up to two years.

Crazy blood stats, right??

Someone somewhere in Wales needs your help – they need your blood! The process usually takes around 15 minutes, and the Welsh Blood Service always have a full staff of very nice people on hand to accompany you through every part of the process, so there’s no need to be nervous!

Also when you’re done you get to enjoy a cup of squash and a Club! (*other sweet treats are also available, but my personal favourite is a Mint Club, in case anyone’s wondering)…

The Welsh Blood Service aims to have at least seven days worth  of different blood types in stock. As you can see, a couple of different blood types are low …

Blood stock levels 04-05-2021

DON’T DELAY! MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT TO GIVE BLOOD TODAY 🙂

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We Are Immersed: How USW students created an online music festival under the shadow of COVID-19

Today’s article comes from Emma Mae Greaves, and includes an invitation for you to join the Immersed! festival this weekend!

How USW students created an online music festival under the shadow of COVID-19

The music industry has found itself in dire straits for the past few months. With live music gone, collaboration at a minimum, and our precious venues closing left, right and centre, morale amongst creatives has been at an all-time low. However, behind the scenes of 2021’s all-new Immersed! Festival we’ve been experiencing something amazing in all of this madness; hope; and this is something we endeavour to share with our viewers this weekend when they finally get to see Immersed! Festival 2021 in all of its virtual glory. Immersed! takes place this weekend (30/31 January) for free! And you can find out everything you need from our Immersed! linktree.

Cherry Boys behind the scenes (photo by Stu Rowles)

 

Streaming (for free, by the way – links at the bottom of this article) from the Immersed! YouTube and Twitch accounts as per the new normal, viewers will get to experience a truly immersive music festival from the comfort of their own homes, all in aid of Teenage Cancer Trust and the #saveourvenues movement. To support this, each performance was specially filmed in venues across Cardiff, and in artists’ bedrooms all across the globe. The students at the University of South Wales that are behind this event have definitely triumphed over adversity, and to do so in the midst of such a critical situation for live music throughout Wales, as well as for the worthy causes we’re supporting, is a fantastic achievement that each and every one of us should be proud of.

From adapting to solely online communication, maintaining a Covid-safe environment, and strictly abiding by lockdown rules, the hurdles in the race the Immersed team have had to jump this year have been higher than ever before, and we’ve been running with weights on our ankles the entire time.

However, though we’re tired, and some of us stressed, hope for a musical future is in the air – with a line-up of nearly 50 incredible acts, six virtual stages, and a massive 200 USW students involved in the creation and delivery of this award-worthy festival. That’s pretty incredible.

In September, when Immersed! 2021 began as a concept in the empty halls of the University of South Wales, it presented itself as more of a huge floating question mark than a festival. But by the start of October, this giant bundle of confusion had actually become something tangible. We had all these ideas, all of this research, and most importantly; we had a plan. This was a plan driven by the music we’re now bringing you, from up-and-coming artists such as Adwaith, Otto, Mace the Great, Yasmine & The Euphoria, Chroma, Telgate, as well as a vast selection of the Libertino Records roster including Bandicoot, KEYS and Papur Wal, among many more.

Ben from The Kelly Line (photo by Natalie Ball)

 

It was a plan driven by the inspiration we took from Tumi Williams (aka. Skunkadelic), Sam Dabb (Le Pub and #saveourvenues) and Sarah Cole (#wemakeevents co-ordinator for Wales) in our talks with them throughout this process. It was a plan driven by a simple message that is now the backbone of the Immersed concept: we are Cardiff, and we are vital. Though this plan changed drastically over the course of putting Immersed! together, it’s still, in my opinion, the most impressive product of teamwork I’ve ever seen, and for third year university students – music students no less – this is a HUGE feat.

 

This sense of teamwork reigned massively over the production of this festival. We all had our roles, and we all (well, most of us) carried them out with perfectly professional practice. The festival scene is something we’re all accustomed to in one form or another but experiencing one from this side of the music has been like stepping into an entirely new world – one which the pandemic has rendered unrecognisable anyway. Nonetheless we embraced it, as we imagined, produced, filmed, programmed, promoted and looked forward to a whole weekend full of true talent, a genuine celebration of Cardiff’s diversity, and a whole lot more online wonder that has exponentially broadened our hopes for the future. We’re genuinely excited to share Immersed! 2021 with the world. 

Wen behind the scenes (photo by Liv Davies)

It’s been a long few months of unanswered emails, uncomfortable ‘please-promote-us’ phone calls, and fourteen hour days filming sets in amazing venues across Cardiff such as Tramshed, Cultvr Lab, and Frontal Lobe Warehouse. But now, we’ve got a whole bank of industry email contacts ready for us to utilise, we can actually pick up the phone and order a takeaway without panicking about what to say, and we saw more bands play in our days spent filming than we have in the last three years. It’s been one hell of a ride, and an insanely rewarding one at that. So, here we are. We’ve made it to the home stretch, and as one final push from me to you I say this: please watch what we’ve been working so hard for.

Enter the festival via the Immersed 2021 Linktree (in our Instagram bio, and on our website). Immersed! begins on Friday at 8pm with a long-awaited workshop from Grammy-award-winning producer High Contrast. We hope to see you there.

IMPORTANT LINKS:

By Emma Mae Greaves

 

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Mary Ocana – LA to Cardiff

Today’s piece is a lovely reflection on living in Cardiff, written by Mary Ocana, who originally hails from South East LA. Also just like to say it wasn’t a deliberate move to publish this on the day the President Biden was inaugurated but what a nice piece of synchronicity, eh?

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Croeso i Gymru” – “Welcome to Cardiff” is a sign I read as soon as I exited the M4 towards Cardiff. A warm and honest welcome.

Cardiff Bay

I have lived in Cardiff for the last three years and every second has been nothing short of a wonderful time. Wales is a country that I have come to see as widely diverse and exciting, and Cardiff now holds a special place in my heart. While it may not be the place where I was born, or where most my family and friends are, it has grown to feel like home in many aspects.

My love for Wales started in 2016 when I first stepped off a train in Ebbw Vale. At that moment, everything felt both foreign and welcoming to me. I remember the surrounding trees and splashing of water from the river stream nearby, and the giant valleys leaning over as if to say “welcome”. Driving around the winding roads, I could hardly grasp what I was looking at. It was beautiful – the only thing that I could compare it to would be scenes in films I had seen in the past, like the green Irish countryside in P.S I Love You. I could see hundreds of sheep sprinkled like sugar atop the valleys, quietly whispering to myself “I’m home”. The cold-yet-inviting air that filled my lungs that day is something I’ll never forget; sometimes it still happens when I get off the train in Ebbw Vale or Rhymney.

Bryn Bach

See, I grew up in South East Los Angeles, in Maywood, California – home to a large Latino population. My parents uprooted their life in Mexico and settled here in their early 20s. It has now become their home and is far more familiar to them than anywhere else. Maywood is only 1.8 miles in diameter, but it is filled with a lot of character and is still a place which harbours memories that will stay with me always. As an only child and the daughter of two low-income immigrant parents, it was difficult to think of the future. I felt like a failure after graduating High School because I did not get into the colleges I applied to and I ended up attending community college.

At the time, it felt like I would never get to have a study abroad experience – which is something I had always wanted to do. I appreciated LA and the OC, but I just simply wanted to see what else there was outside of my comfort zone. Even if it was just upstate, somewhere like UC Davis or somewhere in Rhode Island, far away. I wanted to experience growth in this way.

A few months away from my Cypress College graduation, I found myself staring at an opportunity I had only dreamed of all these years. It was difficult to imagine that I, a 21-year-old from Maywood would ever get the chance to study abroad, but yet here it was – a study abroad experience in Wales. It was a frightening thought, as it meant moving 3,000 miles across the Atlantic ocean and creating a life far away from everything I had ever known. It is a decision I am truly grateful I had the opportunity to make. I am glad I went for it.

Tredegar

Two months after arriving in Wales I found an apartment in Canton. It was a small one-bedroom apartment nestled by Thompson’s Park, and only a 30-minute walk from Cardiff Metropolitan University. It wasn’t long before I eased into my new life in Cardiff. This was something completely new and exciting because I had never lived on my own. I started to develop my own routines and found solace in walking to places like the Canton Fruit Market – partly because of the 50p banana bowls, but mainly because everyone I ran into was so pleasant. Breakfast at Crumbs, coffee from Lufkin and sandwiches from Bee & Honey quickly became my new favourite treats.

On the days that I had to go into university, I walked through Llandaff Fields, I used to cut through the field because I liked the way wet grass felt on my boots. Walking to school was a huge breath of fresh air – back in LA I was used to driving in one-hour traffic just to get to my 8AM lecture, but here I was, walking, witnessing dogs off their leads and the trees welcoming the autumn season. I could not be happier.

Taffs Well

I discovered that, for the most part, Wales is a rainy and cloudy place. This wasn’t a bad thing, however. Coming from a place where it hardly rains, experiencing the rain, whether it was manic or calm, was a lovely contrast.

The first few months I lived in Cardiff, I visited all the “tourist-y” bits. I took a train to Penarth, walked through Alexandria Park (a favourite of mine) and Penarth Pier. Beaches were not foreign to me, but this was the first time that I had ever seen a pebble beach – pebbles as far as I could see and seagulls waiting for the opportunity to swoop in and steal my chips. I took a train to Cardiff Bay, to see the Wales Millennium Centre and the Pierhead Building, it was interesting to read about the history and see what Cardiff Bay used to look like. Barry is one of my favourite places, too, and I feel as though the beaches around Cardiff are hugely underrated.

Ogmore

But, by far, my favourite place I visited and still escape to often is St. Fagans. Turog – the bakery there – is the perfect place to grab a snack to hold on to whilst walking around. When you are at St. Fagans it truly does feel like you are experiencing a piece of history, it is a wonderful feeling. The best thing about visiting all of these places is that they are not far. They are only a short train or bus stop away.

In LA, driving is an absolute necessity. Public transport is decent, but I have to admit it is not the safest or most reliable. In Cardiff, however, I have the pleasure of walking everywhere. If I needed to go into town I could just hop on the 61 bus and be there in ten minutes. On my first day of school, I remember walking down the River Taff trail through Pontcanna Fields and through Bute Park, and it was the first time I witnessed Cardiff Castle – I had never seen a castle in my entire life! I’ll admit I was a bit giddy. Sometimes I still feel that way as I walk past and the clock chimes its tune.

Mary at Lidl in Tredegar

I find myself in the city centre quite a bit, whether it is looking for beetroot wraps in M&S or just wandering around to take in all the Victorian and Edwardian architecture beauty. I enjoy walking through the arcades; the feeling that I get when having a stroll through them is something I can’t quite put into words!

In close proximity to the arcades is the Cardiff Market which, believe it or not, used to be a prison, and now it is home to a wide variety of food stalls and vendors. Cardiff Bakestones is a favourite of mine here because of their vegan Welsh cakes, which are always baked to perfection. I spent a lot of time there, whether it was to drink a flat white from Hard Lines or pizza from Ffwrnes. It is a lovely place to spend an afternoon.

It was also at this time that I experienced snow for the first time! It snowed in January of 2017 and it was super exciting for me. I witnessed a snowy Bryn Bach and Thompson’s Park; they were completely different when they were covered in snow, it was magical, albeit cold but still a wholesome new experience.

I thought I knew what celebrating Christmas was all about in California, but Christmas is truly something special in Wales. It is in the air. During the Christmas season, the city centre becomes a luscious Christmas paradise. There are vendors and stalls and the excitement of Christmas right around the corner. It was the place where I tried mulled wine for the first time and it is the place which I keep coming back to each year for churros, from the lovely Emilio of Churros and Chocolate. Winter Wonderland feels genuinely festive, and we don’t have anything quite like it in California, mostly because of the weather. Celebrating Christmas in the UK has made me appreciate the season more.

Bryn Bach

I lived in Canton for two years and in those two years, I remember how thankful I was that I only had to walk 15 minutes to get to work. I worked in Bloc, at the edge of Victoria Park, and if I got there early, I could hang around the park, watch all the dogs and have a coffee. Getting to work in a coffee shop, and getting to know the regulars and people that lived in Canton was such a lovely experience – everyone was always very friendly and forgiving. Working there was refreshing and it did not compare to any places I had worked in before – I will always be grateful to Bloc.

After living in Canton, I moved to Roath. Roath differs from Canton significantly but it has still been a wonderful place to live in. Because my 50p banana bowls were long far I had to find something else, and rightfully found Sammy from Fruit and Veg Barrow and slowly the routines were settling in. Now I only live twenty minutes away from Roath Lake and the Roath Rose Garden and these places have comforted me throughout these difficult times. Walking around these places and checking out nice spots like Roath Mill Gardens helped me throughout lockdown, and reminded me of how many lil’ gems Cardiff has.

Roath

As a Mexican-American, it has been an absolute joy being surrounded by Welsh people and immersing myself in their culture. Maybe it’s because Welsh people remind me of who I am as a Mexican-American, as there are parallels between each culture and their hard-working attitude.

There is just something genuinely honest and special about Welsh people: they are kind, hardworking, and always up for a good time. Getting to know my partner’s Welsh family was a joy – they were all welcoming, and I quickly began to see them as my own. I didn’t grow up with a lot of family, but Wales and my partner’s family – from their caring attitude to treating me to Sunday dinner – made me feel like I was in one straight away. My eyes begin to water when I think about how proud people are to be Welsh and I am overwhelmed with happiness that I get to experience it.

Wales has taught me more than I could have ever imagined, not only about how fantastic other places in the world can be, but how to love myself. I feel a lot more independent, and I feel like if I can move across the country on my own then I can do absolutely anything. Cardiff and the Welsh Valleys will forever be with me. I cannot thank both my parents and friends enough for believing in me and always encouraging me to follow my heart.

Mary in Penarth

Mary is an Interior Design graduate from Cardiff Met. Thanks Mary for this wonderful account of your past few years living in and around Cardiff!

If you’re interested in writing for We Are Cardiff, please contact us.

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Cardiff, Treat yourself – to some great local independent food and drink!

HAPPY NEW YEAR, LET’S NECK SOME BEER AND CHEER AND EAT ALL OF THE THINGS.

Did everyone else’s dry January last approximately 1.5 days? Asking for a friend. Anyway, I realise it’s a bit late for the old Blwyddyn Newydd Dda but coronavirus rules means you can wish anyone anything anytime you like (so happy Halloween and Yalda greetings, friends!). So happy new year from us here at We Are Cardiff.

This isn’t really a post about new year though, it’s a post about drinking beer. Or wine. Or anything you like. With or without alcohol. And also eating, because eating is great. Basically this is a post reminding all of you that even though we’re locked down, many MANY amazing Welsh indies are still making and baking and roasting and basting and selling, so if you’re shopping online (let’s face it, what else is there to do these days?) then why not fill your food basket with stuff that supports some local businesses?

Hungry / thirsty yet? LET’S GO.

FINE DINING – EAT AT HOME!

Let’s stop d*cking around. You want Michelin guide level fine dining but obviously there’s go getting you to the restaurant at the moment. So sweep the cat hair off the dining table and put on a bra, ‘cos we’ve got some options for you. And they’re fancy as f*ck. (Sorry if you’re here for the full swears, we have a NYRes to try and control our potty mouth).

HEANEY’S

HEANEY’S have put together a Dine at Home box which brings top quality small plates into your home and feeds two people. But be quick – the boxes are limited and so far have been selling out early in the week! They’re still doing their Sunday dinners as well, btw, as well as the sourdough and Marmite butter …. (Dine at Home £85 feeds two people).

Order from Heaney’s website / check out Heaney’s on Twitter.

PURPLE POPPADOM

PURPLE POPPADOM are also doing takeaway set menus – they’ve got a winter set menu (vegetarian and meat options available) that feeds two people – and who wouldn’t want chef Anand George curating that special curry night for them?? They’ve also got an extended a la carte takeaway menu as well. (Winter set menu £27.95 for two people).

Order from Purple Poppdadom website / check out Purple Poppadom on Twitter.

PASTURE

PASTURE are offering Pasture Experience Boxes for the meat lovers (veggies and vegans avert your eyes). And it’s meat tastic. I mean, it’s literally a box full of delicious meat. More meat than I’ve ever seen in a single box. The boxes arrive in time for you to carry out a ‘Pasture cookalong’ with chef and owner Sam Elliott, who will be showing you how to cook your slabs of beef (and all the rest) through a live Instagram event. There are plans for Sunday Roast Cook-alongs and a Porterhouse Box. (Porterhouse Box £95 for two people).

Order from the Pasture website / follow Pasture via Ruby and White on Instagram.

ROCK AND SCALLOP VIA THE CRISPY COD

THE CRISPY COD – while you might not have considered a seafood extravaganza as a viable option during lockdown, the Crispy Cod are here to serve you Rock & Scallop platters which look the absolute business. Also HELLO Kinder Bueno dessert from The Cheesecake Guy, get in my mouth please. (Welsh seafood platter £80 for two to three people).

To order the Rock & Scallop platter text them on 07870600481 / to order the takeaway fish & chips menu go to the The Crispy Cod website / follow The Crispy Cod on Twitter.

THE HUMBLE ONION

THE HUMBLE ONION – this indie bistro in Dinas Powys is also offering Sunday lunches and three course Humble at Home boxes. (Three course boxes are £30 pp).

To order visit The Humble Onion website / follow The Humble Onion on Twitter.

CASUAL MUNCHIES

KERALAN KARAVAN

KERALAN KARAVAN have literally fuelled us throughout the pandemic. Big thanks to Krish in the kitchen for those magic cooking hands. AND they’ve just started their Heat 2 Eat curry club, where you get fresh curries AND BEER brought to your doorstep! I honestly don’t think I could have made it through without that tasty swag in my belly. My favs from KK are their vegan burger and sexy fries. DAMN. The Keralan Karavan Heat 2 Eat curry club needs to be preordered so get yours in now / follow Keralan Karavan on Twitter.

FRANKS

FRANKS – everyone’s favourite hot dawg – have put together home kits as a special treat. There are veggies options alongside their meaty deals, plus cheese and bacon add-ons and some sweet merch. Order from the Franks website / follow Franks on Instagram.

MILKWOOD

MILKWOOD – somewhere in between super fancy dining and delicious lunch and dinner options is where Milkwood have placed themselves, and it’s pitch perfect. We’re big fans of the takeaway pizza menu (hello gorgonzola get yourself in my mouth), plus they do beers, wines and ciders and lovely sandwiches as well. Order and book a collection slot on the Milkwood website / follow Milkwood on Twitter.

BOOZE AND OTHER ESSENTIALS

POP’N’HOPS

POP’N’HOPS have their online shop’n’hops (sorry) open for business, with free delivery for orders over £50, or you can pop’n’lock (seriously stop it now) in there for collection during specific times in the week. Pop’n’Hops specialise in those unusual beers you just can’t get from other places – we are big fans of their massive selection of milk stouts (they’ve even got an alcohol free one!) and all the lovely pale ales. Plus cider. Mmm. Order from the Pop’n’Hops website.

LITTLE MAN

Though you’ll know them for coffee, LITTLE MAN have expanded their delivery catalogue to include all sorts of things for doorstep delivery, three times a week! Our orders from them usually include Oatly Barista oat milk, Who Gives a Crap! toilet paper, blue roll (we make a right mess here in this house) and Freddos. YES FREDDOS YOU HEARD. They also sell WINE which is not a drink I know much about, but check out their selection via Chilled and Tanin. On the way in or on the way out – whichever orifice needs attention, Little Man have got you covered. Choose your own adventure from the Little Man linktree / follow Little Man on Instagram.

VINVANCAERDYDD

VINVANCAERDYDD – an independent, bilingual, online wine delivery service based in Cardiff! Get your booze from them by ordering from the VinVan website / following VinVanCaerdydd on Twitter.

PETTIGREW BAKERIES

PETTIGREW BAKERIES are still STILL nearly a year own baking their way through the pandemic. They’ve been open throughout providing tasty baked goods and kitchen essentials. You can book a slot for collection OR they will deliver some of their patisserie items, if you have some friends who need cheering up with gluten (seriously their brownies should be offered as mood improvers). Have a look at the options on offer from the Pettigrew Linktree / follow Pettigrew Bakeries on Twitter.

HARD LINES

HARD LINES – Hard Lines Coffee are trying to twist my melon by offering so much variety of good things I don’t know what category to stick them in. Their Canton store is open for pick up (although check opening times and days – at the moment they’re closed on Mondays and Tuesdays). In store you can buy coffees, pastries (and burritos on the weekends!) and peruse a massive selection of organic wines and ciders, plus a whole bunch of different kitchen essentials. Their website also offers coffee club subscriptions (great gift ideas) plus ALL THE COFFEE for mail order. If this floats your boat then please enjoy the below image of Mary Berry holding a packet of Hard Lines Coffee. Order from Hard Lines website.

PENYLAN PANTRY

PENYLAN PANTRY have recently reopened for takeaway! They’ve also got kitchen larder essentials (oils, salts, pasta, rice, pulses, tinned tomatoes, eggs, butter, coffee etc), as well as freshly baked bread, homemade soup bottles, homemade cakes, organic veg stand, salad boxes and organic Welsh milk. Big up Mel and the crew. Penylan Pantry website / Penylan Pantry Instagram.

WILD THING

WILD THING are open for pre-ordered takeaways from Thursday to Sunday (go visit their hatch in Cathays Community Centre!). Excitingly, they are also running a Community Fridge! If you’re struggling and in need of food, the community fridge is open EVERY DAY between 9AM-4PM, 36 Cathays Terrace (the fridge is also looking for volunteers, so if you’ve got some time to spare please contact Wild Thing!). They are one of our best social businesses – please do what you can to support them. Pre-order takeaways from the Wild Thing website / follow Wild Thing on Twitter.

OASIS

OASIS SUPPER CLUB – Yes, Oasis are the refugee centre in Splott, but did you know they also run a pre-order supper club? The supper club is relaunching in February 2021 so keep an eye on the Oasis Facebook for info on that – in the meantime, you can order Eritrean Coffee or Iranian Tea from the online Oasis shop. Follow Oasis on Facebook.

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ORDERING A TAKEAWAY? USE A CARDIFF-BASED DELIVERY SERVICE! Yes it exists, and it’s called Indie Eats! It’s a co-op affair which means your local eateries get a better deal from it. Also if you use it, you’ll probably discover some great new places to eat! Visit the Indie Eats website or Indie Eats on Twitter and support that little guy.

CARDIFF MARKETS

YES, you can still find Cardiff Markets still open! You’ll find all manner of producers at these markets, including Ty Caws, The ParsnipShip, Handlebar Barista, Paul’s Organic Veg, Riverside Sourdough, and more! Details below:

PONTCANNA MARKET: Every weekend, Sat 10am – 1:30pm / Sun 10am – 3pm, Kings Road Yard.

RHIWBINA FARMERS’ MARKET: Every Friday 10am – 1pm, Butcher’s  Arms, Heol y Felin

ROATH FARMERS’ MARKET: Every Saturday 9.30am – 1pm, Mackintosh Sports Club, Keppoch Street, CF24 3JW

RIVERSIDE FARMERS’ MARKET: Riverside Farmers’ Market Every Sunday 10am – 1:30pm, Fitzhamon Embankment, opposite. Principality Stadium, City Centre.

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Okay, well I’m now too hungry to carry on. Hopefully some of these have inspired you to add some indie treats into your weekly shop. Because YOU’RE WORTH IT.

If you see anyone we’ve missed out, please add them in the comments!

Peas

WAC x

In Memorial: Mary Sullivan

Afternoon all.

Earlier this week I received the sad news of the passing of Mary Sullivan. Long-time followers of WAC might remember Mary’s post about Newtown (a long-gone neighbourhood of the city also known as ‘Little Ireland’).

Mary at the Newtown Memorial Garden on Tyndall Street.

It remains to this day one of the most read pieces on the We Are Cardiff site, and I am still emailed occasionally by people who have found the post while researching their family history, and have found their way to Newtown.

Mary was Chair and Co-founder of the Newtown Association, an organisation set up in 1996 to record the history of the Newtown community and to keep its memory alive. We’re grateful to her for sharing her memories of the lost neighbourhood of Newtown, and for setting up the Association, who have managed to reconnect a lot of people with distant relatives and family friends from the past.

For those of you interested in paying your respects, the funeral cortege will be visiting the Newtown Memorial Garden on Tyndall Street, on Monday 23 November 2020 around 11:15am.

If you do want to visit, please respect physical distancing rules and allow space around the memorial garden for members of the family. There is limited parking in the area, so we recommend parking at the top of Bute Street and walking over (it’s around a five minute walk from there).

If you’re unable to visit, the funeral will be at 10:30am on Monday morning, and will be streamed (there are strictly limited numbers allowed into the building). Link to the funeral livestream.

For those wanting to send flowers, please consider donating to Kidney Wales instead. The family have set up a JustGiving page to help fundraise for Kidney Wales, an independent charity whose provision of services depends on donations and fundraising events. Unfortunately due to the recent outbreak of COVID-19, a lot of those fundraising events have been cancelled or postponed meaning that a lot of funding that Kidney Wales was depending on is now uncertain. Please help the family support their work during this time of crisis by donating in memory of Mary: JustGiving – In memory of Mary Sullivan.

Our thoughts and love to the family.

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Letters from Cardiff in lockdown: Rhian Pitt

Today’s instalment for the Letters from Cardiff in lockdown series comes from Rhian Pitt, of Cardiff Indie Collective. Although lockdown is lifting, we’re still open for stories, so if it’s taken you a while to put it together, it’s all good with us – please contribute to Letters from Cardiff in lockdown. 

I’ve had three babies to tend to in lockdown.

One is your classic human shaped one with squishy thighs and a dribbly mouth. She was two months old when we entered lockdown. I had only just mastered leaving the house before the announcement was made and we were instructed not to do so. All of a sudden, the four walls of our house was the only world she knew. Sometimes I wonder the impact of it. She recently finished meeting the grandparents. They cried when they held her. So did she. The only other people to hold her since March were PPE clad nurses jabbing a needle into her leg. Lockdown lifting must be blowing her mind – all these people, places.

I won’t use this space to vent my woes of lost maternity leave – other people have been through much worse – and in many ways it was a positive experience, forcing me to slow down and connect with her in a way that ‘normal life’ wouldn’t have allowed, but it was solitary.

Me, my baby and the dog became a unit. We ate together, napped together, exercised together. As my partner left for work every morning we would stay at home. Together. Every day.

That’s my second baby, the dog. A hyperactive collie who is a lover of the great outdoors and a park snob. She was quite possibly the most affected in our household. Just two months earlier she had been pushed into second rank by the arrival of the baby – then all of a sudden we were at home all day, cramping her style, sitting in the armchair that she usually commandeered. It was very hard for her to come to terms with the five mile rule. No more mountains, beaches, open spaces, lakes (she treats Roath Lake like it’s a dirty puddle). The genuine disappointment on her face as we rocked up at Splott Park was palpable. She cottoned on and started digging her heels in like an overtired toddler, refusing to walk as I grappled to get her and baby out the house. She would wriggle out of her harness and hide under the coffee table, her legs quivering at the thought of having to walk past groups of teenagers who were struggling to grasp the concept of social distancing, sprawled over the pathways and smoking fragrant cigarettes. She found the clapping for carers a bit overwhelming.

We must’ve looked like a household lacking in enthusiasm for the carers – quite the opposite, it was incredibly emotional and a clap didn’t quite express the gratitude – but my partner and I had to take it in turns representing on our doorstep while the other had to play the radio really loudly and prance around distracting the dog. It was worse than bonfire night.

My third baby has been a project – a business, a social media campaign, a crowdfunder. It’s called Cardiff Indie Collective and is, if you hadn’t guessed, a collective of Cardiff’s independent businesses. The idea is to showcase them all in one space – many of us follow a select few on social media – but how good would it be to have one space where you can see them all together?

Lockdown has helped to highlight the fact that lots of us would like to shop more locally (Instagram even introduced a shop local tag), but it’s hard if you don’t know where to start.

From the businesses’ perspective, it’s about widening their audience, creating a support network for them to tap into, being a collective voice for when their own needs to be louder.

The plan for this started a couple of years ago when I instigated the ‘Cardiff Gift Exchange’. With the help and support of Business Wales the plan evolved and things got moving while I was pregnant – a slow thought out process – and then BOOM, covid struck and suddenly local businesses were screaming out for help – so it got propelled forward at 100mph – the Crowdfunder was a success with nearly 40 local businesses getting involved. We’ve raised enough money to get a website built, get some super eco-friendly loyalty cards produced, and do some marketing.

Shopping has changed, eating out has changed – but let’s take this opportunity to pull together and turn it into a positive change by helping our independents. You can sign up to our mailing list to hear about the launch at the Cardiff Indie Collective website.

Things I’ve learned from lockdown:

  • My dog is a great listener. She has been by my side daily and made it less lonely.
  • Starting a business with a newborn baby is hard – but when you can’t hang out at awkward baby groups, spend your days in cafes or hanging with the grandparents, then it is a welcome distraction from nappies and dribble.
  • My parents feel really far away. Four months of Whatsapp videos of the baby sleeping/eating/crying/pooing just isn’t the same as a hug.
  • Talking to adults during the day is very important. My vocabulary has reduced by approximately two percent, and forming sentences has become more challenging. When the postman strikes up a conversation I feel like I am in GCSE French oral exam.
  • Being at home all day on your own with a baby doesn’t feel natural. My partner used to come home from work to find the dog sitting in the window waiting. Now he finds me next to her doing the same thing. We are sociable creatures built on communities -we haven’t evolved to be alone at home every day.

  • I am so grateful to live with someone. To have a partner. To have a baby. The importance of human touch on mental wellbeing is profound.

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Thanks Rhian, and good luck with your three babies! Follow Cardiff Indie Collective in the following places:

Want to write for Letters from Cardiff in lockdown? Find out how here…

See also:

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Is it time to reshape the music industry? Lucy Squire guest blog

On the weekend of the UK’s first socially distanced festival at Gisburne Park, the music industry is in a state of uncertainty and mass disruption. Rising from the ashes of the digital apocalypse caused by file sharing and damage to physical sales in the 2000s, last year the UK music scene had grown to one of the most lucrative in the world, contributing over £5bn to the economy every year. Where artists once gigged to promote their new music, there has been a shift to releases generating ticket sales and contributing up to 70 per cent of a musician’s income, as fans flock to concerts and to buy merch. The UK has incredible international standing for both its vibrant festivals and creative talent.

Gisburne Park, UK

Fast forward to today. Music events are cancelled, artists are struggling, the supply chain has collapsed and 90 per cent of music venues could face permanent closure. Many small limited  companies and freelancers have been completely excluded from any funding, grant or support, including being furloughed. There is no current live music ‘industry’, and navigating the future means dealing with multiple complex issues. It’s clear that by its very nature live music will be the last industry to reopen, so the question is – can the sector survive? And if so, how? No one saw this coming …

But is this an opportunity to drive change and reshape the industry, specifically regarding how streaming income is shared out between different stakeholders? Low payouts to artists have been a cause for concern since Spotify launched in 2008. The Musicians’ Union and The Ivors Academy have called for the government to intervene. The UK government’s Department For Digital, Culture, Media & Sport has been called to “investigate how the market for recorded music is operating in the era of streaming to ensure that music creators are receiving a fair reward”.

We are a long way from the 1994 Monopolies and Mergers Commission’s Investigation of the UK Music Market, which was prompted over concern about the high price of CDs and the huge associated profits being made. Post the heady heights of HMV and Virgin retailing, the shutdown of live music is a good time to put the spotlight back on the value of music and address perceptions of it being “free”.

The creative process has been further degraded by recent comments from Spotify CEO Daniel Ek on the rate of album releases, stating it isn’t enough for artists to “record music once every three to four years”. The industry has to be nurtured, it does not serve to churn out hits, but when it does there, should be a comprehensive mechanism for monetisation.

Without doubt, the future will see a blended experience of live music; there is no substitute for physical connectivity, but there are opportunities to engage new audiences using technology. Covid-19 has accelerated this reach. In the first instance, barriers and obstacles to physical attendance at gigs have been removed, with virtual events opening up wider access, inclusivity and diversity. This has to be a good thing.

Going forward, forms of virtual access could run simultaneously to live festivals and gigs for those that can’t or don’t want to attend, ideally with interactive elements. There is a sense of fatigue surrounding live streams but new ground is being broken by events that can really bring a sense of “live”. Step forward Lost Horizons (3-4th July 2020) a fully interactive festival attracting 4.36m viewers, from over 100 countries which took place over six stages built-in VR events platform Sansar. More than 70 DJs and artists, including Fatboy Slim, Carl Cox and Frank Turner, performed and those who attended the festival in Sansar could visit six virtual worlds, with nine camera angles apiece, purpose-built for the occasion.

While it’s not everyone’s bag, and there can never be a replacement for the energy of physical live music, my mind turns to next-generation gig goers, the ones more used to inhabiting virtual worlds. Video games have been an important platform for discovering and consuming music since the early 1990s, and there’s an entire generation of players that owe their music tastes to games such as FIFA, Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater and Grand Theft Auto. Virtual concerts are the next logical step in the relationship between video games and music and there’s certainly an appetite with more than 12 million tuning in for Travis Scott’s ‘Fortnite’ event. Gaming platforms have the capacity to reach millions as well as generate creative new forms of consumer consumption.

There’s plenty of food for thought and experiments already underway, but the horizon can’t all be about tech. At some point, the industry needs to get back on its organic feet and we must ensure that the music industry ecosystem remains when the pandemic has finally passed. Creativity, determination and passion in our community have driven numerous successful campaigns during Covid-19 that raise awareness of the resolute need for more support from the government so that the industry survives in these desperate times. The huge societal response demonstrates just how important music is to our economy, culture, wellbeing and heritage. It can’t be sidelined.

#LetTheMusicPlay #WeMakeEvents #Forgottenltd #ExcludedUK

Lucy Squire is the Manager for Music and Sound at the Faculty of Creative Industries, University of South Wales, Atrium, Cardiff

 

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We Are Cardiff update on Letters from lockdown! It ain’t over till it’s over…

HELLO FRIENDS.

Shwmae. SO. How are you?

It’s been four months (ish) since we went into lockdown.

Three months to the day since we published our first Letter from Lockdown. (Thanks to Neil Cocker for writing our first Letter from Lockdown  – Neil also wrote the very first thing we ever published on We Are Cardiff, so we’re very grateful to him for satisfying our strange desires for cyclical content journeys).

Since then, we’ve published over 80 pieces from you lovely people. You’ve given us your lockdown highs, and lows, details of your running routes, the things you’ve been cooking, all the Zoom calls you’ve been on. We had a letter from our youngest ever contributor. We even had our first marriage proposal. (Side note: he said yes!!!).

As lockdown is lifting (this version of lockdown, anyway), you’ll have noticed the stream of letters has dried up a bit.

We know it’s taken time for some folks to really get to grips with they felt about lockdown, so we’re not closing down the series.

Instead, we welcome you to write pieces about how your lockdown went, now you’ve had some time to reflect. Or you might still be shielding.  Whatever. We’re still welcoming your stories, so please feel free to contact us with your Letter from Cardiff in lockdown. 

SCAN OUR ARCHIVES FOR ALL THE LETTERS FROM CARDIFF IN LOCKDOWN.

Take care of yourselves, Cardiff.

Peas

WAC
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Letters from Cardiff in lockdown: Fardoe’s Paper People

Today’s instalment for the Letters from Cardiff in lockdown series comes from Cynthia Fardoe Thomas, who is bringing us her story via her paper people. We’re still open for stories, so if it’s taken you a while to put it together, it’s all good with us – please contribute to Letters from Cardiff in lockdown. 

Fardoe’s Paper People

I make people out of paper! This is my lockdown story in paper form.

My name is Cynthia Fardoe Thomas, I’m a paper engineer and illustrator, but also a support worker for three adults with learning difficulties.

I’m also a single mum of two beautiful cherubs.

I’ve worked through the pandemic, It’s been a bumpy yet creative ride.

Follow Cynthia on Instagram @FardoesPaperPeople

Want to write for Letters from Cardiff in lockdown? Find out how here…

See also:

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A blog about Cardiff, its people, and the alternative arts and cultural scene!

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